Haglund’s Deformity


Haglund’s deformity

Haglund’s deformity is an abnormality of the foot bone and soft tissues. An enlargement of the bony section of your heel (where the Achilles tendon is located) triggers this condition. The soft tissue near the back of the heel can become irritated when the large, bony lump rubs against rigid shoes. This often leads to bursitis.
Bursitis is an inflammation of the fluid-filled sac between the tendon and the bone. When the heel becomes inflamed, calcium can build up in the heel bone. This makes the bump larger and increases your pain.
Haglund’s deformity can develop in anyone. However, it’s most common in people who wear stiff, closed-heel shoes.

Haglund’s deformity

Causes

Haglund’s deformity occurs when there’s frequent pressure on the backs of your heels. It may be caused by wearing shoes that are too tight or stiff in the heel. Since it often develops in women who wear pump-style high heels, the condition is sometimes referred to as “pump bump.”
You may also be more at risk for getting Haglund’s deformity if you have a high foot arch, have a tight Achilles tendon, or tend to walk on the outside of your heel.
To some extent, heredity plays a role in Haglund’s deformity. Inherited foot structures that can make one prone to developing this condition include:

  • A high-arched foot
  • A tight Achilles tendon
  • A tendency to walk on the outside of the heel.

Haglund’s deformity

Symptoms

Haglund’s deformity can occur in one or both feet. The symptoms include:

  • A noticeable bump on the back of the heel
  • Pain in the area where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel
  • Swelling in the back of the heel
  • Redness near the inflamed tissue

To help prevent a recurrence of Haglund’s deformity:

  • wear appropriate shoes; avoid shoes with a rigid heel back
  • use arch supports or orthotic devices
  • perform stretching exercises to prevent the Achilles tendon from tightening
  • avoid running on hard surfaces and running uphill

Podiatrists at TFAAC have vast experience in diagnosing and treating Haglund’s Deformity and typically this treatment is very successful but involves a multifactorial approach.

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